Hydrofluoric acid, >1-7% aqueous solution

Substance overview Plus
Name:
Hydrofluoric acid, >1-7% aqueous solution
CAS Number:
 
Synonyms:
Fluorhydric acid, Hydrofluoric acid, Hydrogen fluoride, Schedules Toxic Substance; Fluorhydric acid; Hydrofluoric acid; Hydrogen fluoride; Rubigine
Approval number:
HSR001589, Approved with controls
UN Class:
 
UN Number:
 
Molecular weight:
 
Relative density:
0.991
Water solubility:
 
Classification Met. Corr. 1 Plus
Classification route species:
 
Classification description:
H290: May be corrosive to metals.
Classification key study:
 
Classification Acute Tox. 3 Plus
Classification route species:
(oral)
Classification description:
H301: Toxic if swallowed.
Classification key study:

Oral Route
R-PHRASE: R 23 (>/= 1-7%).

Inhalation Route
R-PHRASE: R 23 (>/= 1-7%).

Dermal Route
R-PHRASE: R 24 (>/= 1-7%).

Classification Acute Tox. 3 Plus
Classification route species:
(dermal)
Classification description:
H311: Toxic in contact with skin.
Classification key study:

Oral Route
R-PHRASE: R 23 (>/= 1-7%).

Inhalation Route
R-PHRASE: R 23 (>/= 1-7%).

Dermal Route
R-PHRASE: R 24 (>/= 1-7%).

Classification Acute Tox. 3 Plus
Classification route species:
(inhalation)
Classification description:
H331: Toxic if inhaled.
Classification key study:

Oral Route
R-PHRASE: R 23 (>/= 1-7%).

Inhalation Route
R-PHRASE: R 23 (>/= 1-7%).

Dermal Route
R-PHRASE: R 24 (>/= 1-7%).

Classification Skin Corr. 1C Plus
Classification route species:
 
Classification description:
H314: Causes severe skin burns and eye damage.
Classification key study:

Skin Irritation
R-PHRASE: R 34 (>/= 1-7%).

Eye Irritation
SPECIES: Rabbit
RESULT: Corrosive
REFERENCE SOURCE: Allied Signal Europe N.V. Heverlee (Leuven) J.P. McCulley et al., J. Occup. Med. 1983, 25, 447-450 [IUCLID 2000]

Classification Eye Damage 1 Plus
Classification route species:
 
Classification description:
H318: Causes serious eye damage.
Classification key study:

Skin Irritation
R-PHRASE: R 34 (>/= 1-7%).

Eye Irritation
SPECIES: Rabbit
RESULT: Corrosive
REFERENCE SOURCE: Allied Signal Europe N.V. Heverlee (Leuven) J.P. McCulley et al., J. Occup. Med. 1983, 25, 447-450 [IUCLID 2000]

Classification STOT Single Exp. 1 Plus
Classification route species:
 
Classification description:
H370: Causes damage to organs <or state all organs affected, if known> <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>.
Classification key study:
Repeated dose toxicity:

Oral Route
Primary Organ Effected: Cardiovascular system (heart/vascular system)
Secondary Organ(s) Effected: Bone
Hepatotoxicity (liver)
The average daily hydrogen fluoride intake is on the order of 1.2-3.0 mg/day from food and water, respectively, for children and adults who do not have any occupational exposure to or do not live in the immediate vicinity of industrial operations that emit HF. Use of fluoridated dentifrices contributes an additional 0.25 mg/day; less than 0.1 mg/day comes from inhaled fluoride. This total exposure level (approximately 0.06 mg/kg/day) has been shown to have a cariostatic effect, especially in children, and is generally considered to be the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL). This level of exposure has been established as the oral reference dose (RfD) by the Agency, although it should be noted that very mild dental fluorosis (mottling) has been observed in about 20% of the people who are chronically exposed at this level. The possible carcinogenic potential or chronic exposure to fluoride has been investigated, and the Agency has stated that there is not enough information to conclude that fluoride presents a cancer risk to humans. (Author: Theissen K. Source: Non-serial; Available from National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA as NTIS/PB89-220495, 65 p., 1989.1989 UI: 90665260)
[CANCERLIT]

Dermal Route
Primary Organ Effected: Cardiovascular system (heart/vascular system)
Secondary Organ(s) Effected: Respiratory system

Inhalation Route
Endpoint: NOAEL
Value: 0.000128
Primary Organ Effected: Respiratory system
Secondary Organ(s) Effected: Bone
Cardiovascular system (heart/vascular system)
Eyes
Weight loss/metabolic
Signs of acute fluoride intoxication in humans resemble those observed in animals. Dermal contact with HF either as liquid or as gas produces severe dermal lesions. Dermal contact with HF may result in systemic (cardiac) effects including death. Inhalatory exposure is highly damaging to the respiratory tract. Exposure to HF in a concentration of 1.16 mg/m3 will possibly result in some irritation. Prolonged oral intake of excess fluoride results in skeletal fluorosis, an effect for which indications were also found after inhalatory exposure. The available animal data set for HF permits the derivation of a NOAEL for repeated subchronic inhalatory exposure. No suitable studies are available to derive a NOAEL for HF for other routes of exposure. In a study with rats, changes in body and organ weights as well as haematological and clinical signs and death were seen at actual concentrations of 7.52 mg/m3; 6 hr/d; 5 d/w for 90 days. This value is equal to a duration corrected value (DCV) of 1340 ug/m3. Based on actual exposure levels a NOAEL of 0.72 mg/m3 is established. Because at higher dose levels apart from irritation also systemic effects occur, a duration corrected equivalent of this NOAEL is calculated. This duration corrected value (NOAEL) amounts to 128 ug/m3. (SIDS INITIAL ASSESSMENT PROFILE - Hydrogen fluoride)
[SIDS]

Classification STOT Rep. Exp. 1 Plus
Classification route species:
 
Classification description:
H372: Causes damage to organs <or state all organs affected, if known> through prolonged or repeated exposure <state route of exposure if it is conclusively proven that no other routes of exposure cause the hazard>.
Classification key study:
Repeated dose toxicity:

Oral Route
Primary Organ Effected: Cardiovascular system (heart/vascular system)
Secondary Organ(s) Effected: Bone
Hepatotoxicity (liver)
The average daily hydrogen fluoride intake is on the order of 1.2-3.0 mg/day from food and water, respectively, for children and adults who do not have any occupational exposure to or do not live in the immediate vicinity of industrial operations that emit HF. Use of fluoridated dentifrices contributes an additional 0.25 mg/day; less than 0.1 mg/day comes from inhaled fluoride. This total exposure level (approximately 0.06 mg/kg/day) has been shown to have a cariostatic effect, especially in children, and is generally considered to be the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL). This level of exposure has been established as the oral reference dose (RfD) by the Agency, although it should be noted that very mild dental fluorosis (mottling) has been observed in about 20% of the people who are chronically exposed at this level. The possible carcinogenic potential or chronic exposure to fluoride has been investigated, and the Agency has stated that there is not enough information to conclude that fluoride presents a cancer risk to humans. (Author: Theissen K. Source: Non-serial; Available from National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA as NTIS/PB89-220495, 65 p., 1989.1989 UI: 90665260)
[CANCERLIT]

Dermal Route
Primary Organ Effected: Cardiovascular system (heart/vascular system)
Secondary Organ(s) Effected: Respiratory system

Inhalation Route
Endpoint: NOAEL
Value: 0.000128
Primary Organ Effected: Respiratory system
Secondary Organ(s) Effected: Bone
Cardiovascular system (heart/vascular system)
Eyes
Weight loss/metabolic
Signs of acute fluoride intoxication in humans resemble those observed in animals. Dermal contact with HF either as liquid or as gas produces severe dermal lesions. Dermal contact with HF may result in systemic (cardiac) effects including death. Inhalatory exposure is highly damaging to the respiratory tract. Exposure to HF in a concentration of 1.16 mg/m3 will possibly result in some irritation. Prolonged oral intake of excess fluoride results in skeletal fluorosis, an effect for which indications were also found after inhalatory exposure. The available animal data set for HF permits the derivation of a NOAEL for repeated subchronic inhalatory exposure. No suitable studies are available to derive a NOAEL for HF for other routes of exposure. In a study with rats, changes in body and organ weights as well as haematological and clinical signs and death were seen at actual concentrations of 7.52 mg/m3; 6 hr/d; 5 d/w for 90 days. This value is equal to a duration corrected value (DCV) of 1340 ug/m3. Based on actual exposure levels a NOAEL of 0.72 mg/m3 is established. Because at higher dose levels apart from irritation also systemic effects occur, a duration corrected equivalent of this NOAEL is calculated. This duration corrected value (NOAEL) amounts to 128 ug/m3. (SIDS INITIAL ASSESSMENT PROFILE - Hydrogen fluoride)
[SIDS]